Exclusive - Newcastle are confident they will be able to sign Inter's Valentino Lazaro on loan this January, with the player set to leave San Siro following Ashley Young's arrival from Manchester United.


Steve Bruce's side find themselves five points above the relegation zone in the Premier League, but are actively trying to add reinforcements this window in a bid to retain their top-flight status for another season.

Allan Saint-Maximin has been one of the Magpies' standout forwards this season, but has been out since early December with a hamstring injury sustained against Southampton. Newcastle have scored just 21 goals in the Premier League this season and Bruce is keen to add some firepower to his ranks to boost their attack.


A source has told 90min that the Magpies are confident they can seal a loan move for ​Inter's Lazaro this window, with the deal potentially being completed next week. It is not just Bruce's side who hold an interest, though, with other clubs tracking the Austrian international.


Lazaro will be free to leave the club this window as a direct result of Young's ​arrival. Antonio Conte looks keen to use the 34-year-old in a wing-back position, which would leave right-sided midfielder Lazaro surplus to requirements for the rest of the season.


A loan is the likely outcome, and Newcastle feel they can pip other interested parties to the post for the 23-year-old.

Valentino Lazaro

After registering six assists and scoring three goals for Hertha Berlin last season, Inter decided to snap the forward up for a fee of €22.4m. He has gone on to make six ​Serie A appearances and a further four in the Champions League this term.


Bruce has his sights set on other targets too, with interest retained in Hull City forward Jarrod Bowen. Bowen has been in sparkling form for the Tigers over the last two-and-a-half seasons, scoring 53 goals in 122 appearances - 16 of which have come already this campaign.


Leeds United are interested in the player too, though their reported £3m January loan approach is unlikely to succeed.


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