​Burnley boss Sean Dyche has claimed that Liverpool won the Champions League final against Tottenham by playing "anti-football".


The Reds defeated Tottenham 2-0 in the final, held at Atletico Madrid's Wanda Metropolitano stadium, thanks to goals from Mohamed Salah and substitute Divock Origi.


The game itself was a pretty uninspiring affair, with both sides struggling to find their rhythm in the intense heat of the Spanish capital.

Sean Dyche

Now, ahead of Liverpool's Premier League with Tottenham, Clarets boss Dyche has stoked the fire by suggesting that Jurgen Klopp's side got the job done by abandoning their footballing principles - going on to claim that teams will eventually revert back to a more direct style of play, rather than attempting intricate 'tiki-taka' football.


“You soon swallow your pride about playing out from your own six-yard box if you stop losing and start winning," Dyche said, as quoted by Mirror.


“Check out Liverpool's passing stats in the Champions League final – 67 per cent pass completion, only 280 passes in 90 minutes. Anti-football won the European Cup final. There you go.”


A firm believer in his tactics, which have seen Burnley promoted twice and maintain their status in the Premier League for four consecutive seasons, Dyche will not revert to short passing around his penalty area - and admits that he thinks other teams will follow suit due to coaching methods implemented in youth football.


He continued: "“You wouldn't coach an under-12 team to play like that – and the time will come when people start playing it longer again.

Jurgen Klopp,Sean Dyche

“Glenn Hoddle was the best passer of a football I've ever seen. In the modern game, why on earth would you go up to him and say, 'Sorry, I only want you to pass it 10 yards' when he's got two cannons in his feet? I always get caned for saying that but I don't know why."


Dyche will hope his direct approach can halt ​Liverpool's title charge this weekend, with the Reds currently unbeaten after nine games; with eight wins and one draw to their name.