​The aim is simple. ​Pure and simple.


Propel Arsenal back into the Champions League or suffer the consequences.


Yes, on the surface it would appear both harsh and a somewhat scattergun approach to remove someone from their post, just two years after succeeding a man whose longevity became the holy grail of football management. 


Because, lets be honest, staying at the helm of a major club for 22 years is a feat not to be scoffed at. 

Arsene Wenger

Granted, while in the end it resulted in an atmosphere with soaring levels of toxicity, it demonstrated a differing approach to management that became the dreams and aspirations of every club. Ideally, you would have a manager in place that performs so admirably that there is no need for change, but we all know that football is a results business, fans are fickle etc... And expectation is rife.


So why then is it a fair claim to suggest that if Unai Emery doesn't deliver this season he must be moved on? 


Well, there are a handful of reasons.


Firstly, the late failings of last season where a single point from matches against Crystal Palace, Leicester and Wolves would have secured a top four finish still haven't dissipated among the fanbase. His decision to chop and change his side for the final sprint backfired massively, leaving another season of Thursday night football looming large.

Matteo Guendouzi

Granted, some of the players at his disposal were atrocious at best, but he did have a summer of spending to atone for that. However, having brought in two defenders, a goalkeeper and a holding midfielder, the defence got worse. Those up in the boardroom would not have been best pleased given the outlay, so imagine what the fans thought.


Ultimately, for all of the improvements last season, it wasn't enough, and the club's torrid away form carried over from the season prior coupled with a shocking defensive record.


​Arsenal fans are trying to avoid criticising Emery after pleading for so long to have Arsene Wenger removed and a new messiah brought in. Should they begin lambasting him, it could be deemed as hypocritical having been so vocal about wanting 'Le Professeur' gone.


Which brings us onto this season. Unquestionably the winners of the summer window were Arsenal. Miracles have been worked from top to bottom to acquire the players they have, with the Spaniard seemingly having every name on his wishlist ticked off this window.

A highly-rated left back was brought in, a future star in William Saliba will join next season, and David Luiz was pinched from ​Chelsea to offer a short-term fix at the back. Furthermore, an already exciting forward line has been blessed with further strength in the shape of Nicolas Pepe, while Dani Ceballos offers an exciting prospect in the number eight role.


More remarkably, the much-maligned owners of the club have clearly showcased a degree of compassion for supporters this time, who for long have cried out for big investments and ambition from those in charge.


Its make or break.


Unai Emery now has a squad more than capable of challenging for the top four. 


He had a squad last season that was qualified, but they fell short.

Unai Emery

Now, he's got talent from back to front and if he can't get this crop of players challenging for a Europa League crown and the upper echelons of the ​Premier League, it's adios.


Given the quality of the sides fighting for the spot, it makes the task seem more straight forward. Chelsea were unable to sign any players, Mateo Kovacic aside, while ​Manchester United spent big on defensive additions but are placing a lot of pressure on Marcus Rashford to spearhead a side who were mostly awful for the entirety of last season.


Arsenal look more equipped to fight for ​Champions League football than they have for the last ten years, and if Emery doesn't deliver, someone else will.


While its all well and good suggesting this from a fans point of view, the fact of the matter is those were the guidelines set out for him when he took over.

Handed a two-year deal when he took the reins, it makes it all the more evident that his assignment was the Champions League in no less than two seasons. Furthermore, the option of a third year is part of the deal, which one can safely assume will be triggered if the criteria are met.


Therefore, the pressure will certainly be weighing heavy on the 47-year-old, knowing full well if he doesn't deliver results then a phone-call asking him to 'pop into the office' beckons.


Money has been spent and the fans are expectant, it's in Emery's hands now.