Real Madrid and Portugal's forward  Cristiano Ronaldo gestures on stage during the 2015 FIFA Ballon d'Or award ceremony at the Kongresshaus in Zurich on January 11, 2016. AFP PHOTO / OLIVIER MORIN / AFP / OLIVIER MORIN        (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)

Ranking 7 of the Best Football Documentaries on Netflix & Amazon Prime

For those of us who can't get enough football, Netflix and Amazon Prime have stepped up to fill any voids you might have (despite there being roughly 928 matches over the last week or so).


Full of insightful documentaries and a rare behind the scenes look at football clubs and players' lives, the two streaming giants possess some of the most critically-acclaimed programmes there are.


To help you decide which ones to watch however, here is a look at seven of the very best:

7. Premier League Legends (2014) - Netflix

If you're looking for something reasonably short and more digestible, then Premier League Legends may well be the documentary for you. Broken into 25-minute episodes, with each one featuring one of the greats of the Premier League era, the series should have at least something for everybody.


Despite Netflix only having Series 2 in its library, the list of players on it is certainly enough in terms of quality. The likes of David Ginola, Jamie Carragher, Thierry Henry, Juninho and Paolo Di Canio are involved, with the programme featuring in-depth interviews with the players and their teammates.


Chronicling some of their best moments of their Premier League career, the documentary acts as a refreshing throwback to some of the greatest players to have stepped foot on to a football pitch. With the episodes relatively short compared to some of the others featured on this list, Premier League Legends is a decent alternative to some of the longer, time-consuming documentaries that are out there.

6. Manchester City: All or Nothing (2018) - Amazon Prime

Despite being understandably skewed in a pro-Manchester City direction, All or Nothing does capture the one thing that most football fans would be intrigued to see: Pep Guardiola. One of the greatest coaches of this generation, the documentary offers a fascinating insight into the manic yet charismatic presence that Guardiola exudes.


With a heavy emphasis on the Spanish manager's tactical genius and penchant for controlling the game from the sidelines, All or Nothing keeps you interested by sharing a locker room perspective with one of the modern greats. Football fans don't typically see the instructions given out to players, the demands put on them, the tiny, often trivial-looking information that they need to remember; this documentary gives the audience unprecedented access and an exciting glimpse of football at the highest level.


One of the highlights of the series comes when an obviously angry Guardiola walks into the dressing room at half-time and yells, 'Sit down, nobody talk!' at his squad of multi-million pound players. More of a look at Guardiola himself and his coaching abilities rather than Manchester City as a football club overall, All or Nothing is still a very watchable affair.

5. Ronaldo (2015) - Netflix

Released a year before now Juventus forward Cristiano Ronaldo won the European Championships with Portugal in 2016, the documentary charts the entire life and career of the multi-Ballon d'Or winner. 


Focusing not just on his exploits on the pitch, but his day-to-day living too, the film features clips and highlights throughout his life, including interviews with both Ronaldo as well as his friends and family. Narrated mostly by BAFTA nominee David Morrissey, the documentary succeeds in humanising a footballer who has so often been criticised for his apparent arrogance.


Scenes involving Ronaldo and his son Cristiano Jr often steal the limelight, with the former Real Madrid superstar's affectionate parenting providing a very real insight into the man off the pitch.

4. First Team: Juventus (2018) - Netflix

Divided into two seasons with three episodes each, First Team: Juventus takes an unprecedented behind the scenes look, as cameras follow the Serie A champions on and off the pitch in their 2017/18 campaign. 


Filled with exclusive interviews with first-team stars and manager Massimiliano Allegri, the documentary steps into the lives of players off it as much as it does on it. A club steeped in grand tradition, the documentary offers remarkable insight into the mentality of the players and coaching staff.


Led by an Italian spine of Gianluigi Buffon, Giorgio Chiellini and Andrea Barzagli, the docu-series makes it clear how influential these club stalwarts are to the success of their team. In their crunch Champions League second leg against Tottenham in the last 16, Allegri's coaching and feel for the game is highlighted brilliantly, with the Italian tactician's changes instrumental to knocking the north London side out of the competition.


With such a wealth of documentaries surrounding Premier League clubs and players around, First Team: Juventus offers a fresh, alternative perspective into one of the most dominant forces in European football.

3. The Class of '92 (2013) - Amazon Prime

David Beckham. Ryan Giggs. Paul Scholes. Nicky Butt. Gary Neville. Phil Neville. Clubs nowadays are often content with producing just the one academy star capable of playing for the first team. But for Manchester United in 1992, they had six homegrown talents who went on to form the backbone of some of the most successful sides in the club's glorious history.


The Class of 92 chronicles the rise of United's group of young stars, highlighting their remarkable achievements together. But perhaps most interestingly, the documentary tells the story of a bunch of friends, who grew up supporting the club they ended up playing for.


With some light-hearted moments entwined within, particularly through stories and pranks involving Paul Scholes, The Class of 92 is a fascinating watch, not just for United. 


If there's one quote from the film that really encapsulates both the documentary and the people involved in it, then Scholes probably says it best: "I think, in our eyes, we were just playing a game of football with our mates."

2. Bobby Robson: More Than a Manager (2018) - Netflix

A superbly poignant and genuine tribute to one of the most revered individuals in British football, both as a coach and as a man, Bobby Robson: More Than a Manager is laced with feel-good moments and raw emotions.


Diving into his career as England manager and his reactions to Diego Maradona's infamous 'hand of God' goal in 1986, his times with Ipswich Town, and then his late spell with hometown club Newcastle, the film highlights both the highs and lows of Robson's career.


Featuring interviews with the likes of Jose Mourinho, Sir Alex Ferguson and Pep Guardiola, it is clear to see how much of an effect Robson had on some of the best managers of the modern era, both personally and professionally.


If you're looking for a more real and emotionally-packed documentary, then look no further than Bobby Robson: More Than a Manager.

1. Sunderland 'Til I Die (2018) - Netflix

Sunderland 'Til I Die follows the Black Cats and their fans in the club's first season in the Championship after their relegation from the Premier League in 2017. The eight-episode first season (with a second seemingly on its way) charts the highs and lows of their journey in English football's second flight, capturing the sheer volatile nature of the club with the numerous changes in players and backroom staff.


With a unique look into the lives of professional footballers, Sunderland 'Til I Die strikes the right match between providing an insight into Sunderland's struggles off and on the pitch. But more than just taking a look inside the bubble that often exists with a football club, the documentary is refreshing in its willingness to showcase the fans and the effects the club has on the city and general society.


With a season two in the works, now may be a great time to get the first season under your belt, before you strap in for another topsy-turvy journey with the Mackems.