​Gareth Southgate has revealed the five most important principles of positive coaching in a handbook, as part of the latest Respect campaign for the FA. 


The handbook, entitled 'We Only Do Positive', highlights the need for affirmation and positive reinforcement in football, especially at grassroots level. The campaign came about after the FA's research team concluded that 90% of young players perform better with positive encouragement.

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In the introduction of the handbook, which is aimed at parents and coaches of aspiring footballers, Southgate explains: "In your position, you’re likely to be one of the most important role models in a young person’s life. 


"Your role in helping children to develop as footballers and young people should never be underestimated. The way you act, the way you behave and the time you commit plays a massive part in their lives."


He goes on to say: "At youth level our first and foremost aim should always be that everybody enjoys their football."

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The England manager then elaborates on his five guiding principles to enacting such coaching, which are: (1) "Create the Right Environment", (2) "Lead By Positive Example", (3) "Understand Your Players", (4) "Build a Positive Team Around You" and (5) "Instil An 'Anything is Possible' Attitude". 


The 'We Only Do Positive' handbook was launched via a press conference with a twist, whereby the 48-year-old fielded questions from local school children about the importance of positivity as England manager.

In the video, Southgate is asked why it's key for his players to try things without failure, to which he replies: "Everybody should try to be the best they can be, and even if it goes wrong, actually you learn from the things that go wrong."


One of the kids also asked Southgate who the manager was when England won the World Cup, and when the manager queried if the kid knew the answer himself, another kid popped up with the answer: "Yes. You!"


Laughing, the tactician replied: "Ooh, well nearly, nearly."